logo hoog 1
  • Lissabon
  • Beja
  • Lousal
  • Grândola
  • Santiago do Cacém
  • Évora

Sightseeing

 

Culture outings

Santiago do Cacém
Miróbriga – Roman city

Lousal
Parque Mineiro do Lousal

Beja
Romeinse Villa at Pisões

Évora
UNESCO world heritage

Lissabon
A visit to Lisbon requires a one-hour travel. The capital is totally worth a visit. There is too much to do and see to list here, but much more complete information awaits you in the cottage.

Miróbriga: Romeinse stad – Santiago do Cacém
Main occupation period approximately 50 to 300 AD.
Size 10-12 acres
Population in Roman times : about 2000


Miróbriga: Roman City- Santiago do Cacém
Main occupation period approximately 50 to 300 AD.
Size 10-12 acres
Population in Roman times : about 2000

Typical Roman provincial town, a sort of résumé of what to expect on larger excavations. A central marketplace (forum), a basilica and curia (government buildings) and a few temples. Around these the tenement-houses (insulae) which where rented to the general population. And a few examples of the Domus, the great houses of the wealthy.
Last but not least, as inevitable in a Roman excavation as in the live of any self-respecting Roman citizen, the baths (balnae); especially the so-called Western bath is very well preserved.

Directly at the entrance is an information center, it is recommended to enter this before visiting the site.


Parque Mineiro do Lousal – Lousal
Since the stone age the so-called Iberian Pyrite Belt saw mining activities for the mineral pyrite (FeS2) originally used as flint and steel (hence the name), later as raw material for processing iron and sulfur. The industrial mining started here in 1850, the peak years were around a century later. Then the interest in pyrite waned.

The industrial mining started here in 1850, the peak years were around a century later. Then the interest in pyrite went back.
In 1988, the pyrite mines of Lousal were closed down permanently. In order to prevent economic and social decline, but mainly to prevent destruction of the unique landscape the mining activities generated, the region was transformed into a cultural park.
Apart from the beautiful surroundings, the museum is interesting for visitors. Everything is exposed in beautifully restored old mining buildings. Surrounded by the homes of workers and overseers , it requires little effort to imagine how this mine once formed a small town in itself.
More information: www.lousal.cienciaviva.pt

Visit the nearby crafts center or end your visit in restaurant “Armazém Central”

Romeinse Villa bij Pisões – Beja
A Villa is not so much a Roman country house as a big farm, with a luxurious main residence for the owner and various outbuildings for staff, mostly slaves. This villa was a village in itself with its own water, baths, sanctuaries.

The Roman dam, providing this venture with its water, lies due west of the main house (across the road) and can still be seen.
The great wealth of the former owners becomes particularly clear in the many mosaic floors that are still visible on the site, a rare fact given their considerable art-historical value.
They date from different periods (2e to 4th century AD) and show quite different styles. Absolutely recommended.
And leave very different styles. Highly recommended.


Évora – UNESCO world heritage
Évora is a (university) city in the southeast of Portugal, it is the capital of the Alentejo region. The city has about 50,000 inhabitants. Worth a day trip, an hour’s drive away from No Campo.
Worth a day trip, an hour’s drive of No Campo.

It is over 2000 years old and home to some striking contrast : labyrinthine streets and sunny squares, Moorish courtyards and Gothic portals.

From Roman times remain the Diana Temple, some walls, an aqueduct and baths. The Muslim period is represented by the Mouraria district. The historic center is completely surrounded by a robust city wall. Évora in its “golden age” was a city that attracted artists from Flanders, Italy and Spain, who all contributed to its luster. Testimony to their prowess are the early Gothic cathedral, built from 1186 to 1204, and the cloister from the 14th century.

So numerous are the traces of that glorious time, that UNESCO has put the entire city on the world heritage list.

But also in the immediate vicinity is a lot to see. Santa Margarida da Serra itself, Melides or Alcácer do Sal.